• Third Thursday from Racial Justice Working Group

    How would it feel to be a society forgotten, seen as extinct, or as a relic of the past? How would it feel to see World Series celebrations that include chants and actions that demean and stereotype your community?

     

    November is National Native American Heritage Month. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the current population of Native Americans in the United States is 6.79 million, which is about 2% of the entire population. There are 574 federally recognized tribal nations and approximately 400 non-federally recognized tribes – with varying spiritual practices, languages, economies, political structures, traditions and histories.

     

    This November we can take the opportunity to acknowledge and celebrate the rich, diverse cultures, traditions, histories and important contributions of Native peoples; to call out harmful racist stereotyping; and also to appreciate the resilience and strength of Indigenous peoples today!

     

    Jon Swan, an enrolled member of the Chippewa Cree tribe, a resident of Winchester and Network for Social Justice board member, put it this way, “Besides history, it’s about understanding modern-day Indian country.”

     

    There are many resources provided by Indigenous People that we can turn to in this month and throughout the year, to enhance our knowledge and understanding.

     

    Ideas/suggestions:

     

    TO LEARN MORE ABOUT INDIGENOUS MASCOTS

    -13 minute TED talk by Maulian Dana, Indigenous woman from ME https://youtu.be/XVAdGXrU60w

    -2 min video (appropriate for some children): https://youtu.be/mR-thOxlhvE

    -8 min video (definitely for adults): https://youtu.be/ZliUl9KX4

    -Less than 2 min video (good for educators): https://youtu.be/4kUeorW3r-I

    -Sports Illustrated article about World Series behavior:   www.si.com/mlb/2021/10/28/atlanta-braves-tomahawk-chop-daily-cover

     

    VISIT

    The Danforth Museum has an exhibit called “Indigenous Voices.” “Contemporary Indigenous Artists are such an important part of the art world today but are often overlooked,” said Rachel Passannante, exhibit organizer. Tues.-Sun: 12-5 PM

    danforthmuseum@framingham.edu

     

    WATCH

    -“Home From School: The Children of Carlisle” Children removed from their tribal homelands, sent to boarding schools and forced to assimilate to western culture and the ensuing intergenerational trauma for Native families.

    -Tue (11/23 at 9 PM) GBH 2

    – Wed (11/24 at 7pm) and Sat (11/27 at 1pm) GBH WORLD

     

    READ NONFICTION

    -All The Real Indians Died Out and 20 Other Myths About Native Americans by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz and Dina Gilio-Whitaker

    -An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States (for Young People) by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz. Adapted by Jean Mendoza and Debbie Reese. (Recommended for teens and adults)

     

    READ FICTION

    -The Road Back to Sweetgrass by Linda LeGarde Grover

    -There, There by Tommy Orange

     

    BOOKS FOR CHILDREN BY AGE and an important resource –

    Please consider following Dr. Debbie Reese, a Nambé Pueblo educator and founder of the American Indians in Children’s Literature blog for comprehensive reviews: https://americanindiansinchildrensliterature.blogspot.com. All of these books can be ordered by Winchester’s local book shop, Book Ends – https://bookendswinchester.indielite.org, or visit independent Native-owned (Louise Erdrich) book store online – https://birchbarkbooks.com

     

    Elementary school 

    -Fry Bread: A Native American Family Story, Kevin Noble Maillard and Juana Martinez-Neal

    -Greet the Dawn by S.D. Nelson (and many other books by S.D. Nelson)

    -We Are Water Protectors by Caroline Lindstrom and Michaela Goade

    -Sisters of the Neversea by Cynthia Leitich Smith

     

    Middle School

    -Indian No More by Charlene Willing McManis with Traci Sorel and cover art by Marlena Myles

    -The Birchbark House series and Chickadee by Louise Erdrich

    -Tales of the Mighty Code Talkers, graphic novel edited by Arigon Starr

     

    High School

    -Apple (Skin to the Core) by Eric Gansworth, Eel Clan Onondaga

    -#NotYourPrincess: Voices of Native American Women by Lisa Charleyboy and Mary Beth Leatherdale

    -Marrow Thieves and Hunting by Stars by Cherie Dimaline

     

    Other helpful lists for children and young adults:

     

    Best Graphic Novels  https://americanindiansinchildrensliterature.blogspot.com/2018/08/best-graphic-novels-by-native-writers.html

    Deconstructing Myths About Thanksgiving: http://oyate.org/index.php/resources/43-resources/thanksgiving

    Best Books About Thanksgiving: https://americanindiansinchildrensliterature.blogspot.com/2007/11/good-books-about-thanksgiving.html

    American Indian Library Association Awards Listhttps://ailanet.org/activities/american-indian-youth-literature-award/

     

     

     

    BOOKS FOR CHILDREN BY AGE and an important resource –

    Please consider following Dr. Debbie Reese, a Nambé Pueblo educator and founder of the American Indians in Children’s Literature blog for comprehensive reviews: https://americanindiansinchildrensliterature.blogspot.com. All of these books can be ordered by Winchester’s local book shop, Book Ends – https://bookendswinchester.indielite.org, or visit independent Native-owned (Louise Erdrich) book store online – https://birchbarkbooks.com

     

    Elementary school 

    -Fry Bread: A Native American Family Story, Kevin Noble Maillard and Juana Martinez-Neal

    -Greet the Dawn by S.D. Nelson (and many other books by S.D. Nelson)

    -We Are Water Protectors by Caroline Lindstrom and Michaela Goade

    -Sisters of the Neversea by Cynthia Leitich Smith

     

    Middle School

    -Indian No More by Charlene Willing McManis with Traci Sorel and cover art by Marlena Myles

    -The Birchbark House series and Chickadee by Louise Erdrich

    -Tales of the Mighty Code Talkers, graphic novel edited by Arigon Starr

     

    High School

    -Apple (Skin to the Core) by Eric Gansworth, Eel Clan Onondaga

    -#NotYourPrincess: Voices of Native American Women by Lisa Charleyboy and Mary Beth Leatherdale

    -Marrow Thieves and Hunting by Stars by Cherie Dimaline

     

    Other helpful lists for children and young adults:

     

    Best Graphic Novels  https://americanindiansinchildrensliterature.blogspot.com/2018/08/best-graphic-novels-by-native-writers.html

    Deconstructing Myths About Thanksgiving: http://oyate.org/index.php/resources/43-resources/thanksgiving

    Best Books About Thanksgiving: https://americanindiansinchildrensliterature.blogspot.com/2007/11/good-books-about-thanksgiving.html

    American Indian Library Association Awards Listhttps://ailanet.org/activities/american-indian-youth-literature-award/

     

    Kaye Nash

     

    A member of the Racial Justice Working Group: Judy Arnold, Will Burhans, Sarah Gallop, Jonathan Goodell, Anne Hoenicke, Jerry Mechling, Kaye Nash and Julianne Zimmerman.

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